Itinerant workers of mice and men. The Relationship Between Two Itinerant Workers in Of Mice and Men :: John Steinbeck, Literary Analysis, Analytical Ess 2019-02-25

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Of Mice and Men and Migrant Farm Workers of the Great Depression

itinerant workers of mice and men

Of Mice and Men is a well known novel written by John Steinbeck. Lennie interrupts, his enthusiasm overriding his self-control; again demonstrating his childlike mind and how frequently they must discuss their dream for him to remember the details when he so often forgets other things. Migrant Workers Who are migrant workers? After world war I the market price of farm crops dropped and caused the great plains farmers to increase producivity. The outsiders I have chosen are George, Lennie and Crooks, purely because they are the only characters who are different from the rest. Even when she expresses her miserable loneliness, these episodes are followed by instances of manipulation, of threatening. George and Lennie are itinerant workers which move from ranch to ranch searching for work.

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Of Mice and Men

itinerant workers of mice and men

The one man who could serve as a nonjudgmental companion cannot coexist safely with others. This makes is easier to read. After all, Lennie is quite likable and, when around George, controllable. These itinerant laborers don't have an opportunity to settle down with women in mutually respectful relationships, it seems. Candy can do nothing to stop this; he is weak, and in this world the strong survive.


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Of Mice and Men

itinerant workers of mice and men

The Great Depression altered the existence of the majority of the working population of America. Crooks is a stable hand with a bad back who is isolated from the farm because of his skin color. It is one of the main themes of the book. It was a terrible time to be poor, and most were. Today, this time, the 1930's, is branded the Great Depression. This caused what we now call the dust bowl.

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Migrant Workers

itinerant workers of mice and men

They get both of these as the agency 'Murray and Ready's' find them work at 'Buck Barley'. As there was a shortage of money in families, it was very hard to get food. This was known as the 'American Dream'. They both realise that they are not suited to each other; Curly just likes the fact that he has something over the other men; he has something to do at night, every night if he wants, and what other men can't. Life was very strict for the men, they were ordered about left, right and centre, and always told what to do.

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Of Mice and Men Exposes the Lives of Migrant Workers in...

itinerant workers of mice and men

Both George and Lennie express their distaste for this sort of man. In the endless war against weakness and despair, these are the bright rally flags of hope and of emulation. The two men are held together by their dream the American Dream to have their own place and be their own masters. This bears peaceful connotations and is similar to when Jesus Christ is baptised in the River Jordan. They argued that the rise of industrial economy corresponds to a loss of contact with the natural processes of life. In my opinion, the migrant workers had a 'dream', so they had something to look forward to and work towards when they had enough money. Each of the characters has his own set of problems.

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Of Mice and Men Exposes the Lives of Migrant Workers in...

itinerant workers of mice and men

It was a very sexist view, and that was what Steinbeck was trying to show by not giving her a name, that some of the American's views were still very sexist. When, in the end, he is effectively euthanized by George, we see that even his friend and companion has accepted that Lennie, like Candy's dog, is better off dead. He lives in his own, separate bunkhouse, which shows how much further isolated he is from the rest of the workers. We are shown this when Lennie loses his temper in the bunk-house with Curley and ends up crushing his hand. This is the idea of independence, owning your own plot of land and not having to w. The quest of George and Lennie, two migrant workers, is an example of the dilemma of thousands of homeless and unemployed men in America during the Great Depression… 1644 Words 7 Pages winning novels, The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men; Steinbeck is also a Nobel Prize winning of Literature.

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Explore John Steinbeck's presentation in Of Mice and Men of the culture and experience of the itinerant workers in 1930's America.

itinerant workers of mice and men

During this period, many people were racist, sexist and prejudice towards disabled people. Although Crooks is a good person he is separated from the other men on the ranch because of his color. Curley's wife is probably the person who gets the loneliest on the ranch, even though she isn't a migrant worker, as her husband doesn't pay her any attention whatsoever. He is of average size and terribly anxious about that. In the first chapter, George and Lennie are portrayed like tramps, who wander the streets looking for a place to live and work.

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Of Mice and Men Themes

itinerant workers of mice and men

Steinbeck uses setting, theme, characterisation, and a modernist simple style to portray a 1930s American society, which was isolating, alienating… 1045 Words 5 Pages Truths Exposed in Of Mice and Men John Steinbeck's timeless novel Of Mice and Men is a somewhat controversial story of the hardships of life. Steinbeck continued writing throughout the 1940s and 1950s. Of the other characters, and 's wife also show signs of desperate loneliness, though they respond quite differently. As evident, George keeps looking out for Lennie to ensure everything is okay and there are no problems with him or anyone else. Lennie Small is a simple-minded, slow moving, shapeless hulk with pale eyes whose enormous physical strength often causes him to get into trouble.


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Migrant Workers

itinerant workers of mice and men

They are bottom of the social ladder, being ranch workers, and travel from location to location in search for employment. Migrant workers came to be known as Okies, for although they came from many states across the Great Plains, twenty percent of the farmers were originally from Oklahoma. Of course both episodes - Lennie's visit with Crooks in Chapter Four and his talk with Curley's wife in Chapter Five - end respectively in bitterness and tragedy. John Steinbeck's novella Of Mice and Men follows two men, George and Lennie, through their somewhat lonely and isolated lives on the ranch. The increase in farming activity across the Great Plains states caused the precious soil to erode. Once George and Lennie entered the bunkhouse the reader meets most of the main characters, such as Slim and Curley. Curley's wife is regularly used as a scapegoat in the novel.

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